Thursday, September 12, 2013
[My] favorite planet is Earth. I grew up on Earth. My friends are all Earthlings. We interviewed Bill Nye the Science Guy, who is a delight. (via entertainmentweekly)
Monday, June 17, 2013
millionsmillions:

A team of physicists has developed a theory for “how to cloak a region of space from the quantum world, thereby shielding it from reality itself.”

what

millionsmillions:

A team of physicists has developed a theory for “how to cloak a region of space from the quantum world, thereby shielding it from reality itself.”

what

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

A story, if broken down into the simplest form, is a connection of cause and effect. And that is exactly how we think. We think in narratives all day long, no matter if it is about buying groceries, whether we think about work or our spouse at home. We make up (short) stories in our heads for every action and conversation. In fact, Jeremy Hsu found [that] “personal stories and gossip make up 65% of our conversations.”

Click through for an incredibly interesting morning coffee/tea/diet coke (or… juice? Is that a thing people drink still? Healthy people, get at us) read on The Science of Storytelling from Lifehacker. 

A story, if broken down into the simplest form, is a connection of cause and effect. And that is exactly how we think. We think in narratives all day long, no matter if it is about buying groceries, whether we think about work or our spouse at home. We make up (short) stories in our heads for every action and conversation. In fact, Jeremy Hsu found [that] “personal stories and gossip make up 65% of our conversations.”

Click through for an incredibly interesting morning coffee/tea/diet coke (or… juice? Is that a thing people drink still? Healthy people, get at us) read on The Science of Storytelling from Lifehacker. 

Thursday, April 19, 2012
You are warned
Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors
Read the article at Scientific American

You are warned

Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors

Read the article at Scientific American

Thursday, March 8, 2012
The QWERTY Effect: How Typing May Shape the Meaning of Words

A keyboard’s arrangement could have a small but significant impact on how we perceive the meaning of words we type.
Specifically, the QWERTY keyboard may gradually attach more positive meanings to words with more letters located on the right side of the layout (everything to the right of T, G and B).
“We know how a word is spoken can affect its meaning. So can how it’s typed,” said cognitive scientist Kyle Jasmin of the University of College London, co-author of a study about the so-called “QWERTY effect” in Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. “As we filter language, hundreds or thousands of words, through our fingers, we seem to be connecting the meanings of the words with the physical way they’re typed on the keyboard.”

Continue reading at Wired Science

The QWERTY Effect: How Typing May Shape the Meaning of Words

A keyboard’s arrangement could have a small but significant impact on how we perceive the meaning of words we type.

Specifically, the QWERTY keyboard may gradually attach more positive meanings to words with more letters located on the right side of the layout (everything to the right of T, G and B).

“We know how a word is spoken can affect its meaning. So can how it’s typed,” said cognitive scientist Kyle Jasmin of the University of College London, co-author of a study about the so-called “QWERTY effect” in Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. “As we filter language, hundreds or thousands of words, through our fingers, we seem to be connecting the meanings of the words with the physical way they’re typed on the keyboard.”

Continue reading at Wired Science

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

nationalpost:

Giant fossil penguin found in New Zealand
Fossilized remains of one of the largest penguins ever, an “elegant” giant standing 1.3 metres tall, have been found in New Zealand, scientists said Tuesday.

The penguin lived 27-24 million years ago, when New Zealand was mostly underwater and consisted of isolated, rocky outcrops that offered protection from predators and plentiful food supplies, researchers said.

Sunday, February 26, 2012

A Record Player That Plays Pieces Of Wood, Not Vinyl

German artist Bartholomäus Traubeck has developed a record player that spins slices of wood from a tree’s cross-section, instead of vinyl. 

Called ‘Years’, Traubeck has modified a turntable’s needle by replacing it with a digital camera and light that scans the wood for thickness, growth rate, texture and overall color tone. 

A computer then interprets the data and maps it into a musical scale, which is then played back using piano sounds. 

What results are hauntingly beautiful melodies that differ based on the tree’s age. 

According to Traubeck, his turntable serves as an “impulse for the recipient’s imagination [as the listener] can speculate about things like the passing of time or natural phenomena, but it is never based on scientific facts that could be found in the music”. 

More at Design Taxi

Thursday, February 16, 2012 Saturday, January 28, 2012
curiositycounts:

Albert Einstein was very slow to speak and his parents feared he wasn’t too bright. One day, when he was sick in bed, they gave him a compass to him occupied. The new plaything made him wonder about magnetic fields, which got him interested in physics, and, well, you know the rest.

curiositycounts:

Albert Einstein was very slow to speak and his parents feared he wasn’t too bright. One day, when he was sick in bed, they gave him a compass to him occupied. The new plaything made him wonder about magnetic fields, which got him interested in physics, and, well, you know the rest.

Wednesday, December 21, 2011
Oh yea, the fabulous Brain Pickings is now on Tumblr. 
bookpickings:

The Extraordinary Catalog of Peculiar Inventions: The Curious World of the Demoulin Brothers and Their Fraternal Lodge Prank Machines - from Human Centipedes and Revolving Goats to ElectricCarpets and
Julia Suits

Freemasonry was born out of medieval craft guilds — working men distinguished by their freedom, not bonded into serfdom, indenture, or slavery. Masons were primarily aristocratic, and if not wealthy, then at least refined. The fraternal lodges of the Elks, the Shriners, the Woodsmen, and the Moose, to name a few, offered a more casual form of brotherhood. Developed with masonic screeds in mind, they populated small towns and suburbs and its provided its members with a reason to get together once or twice a week. 
 In 1892, a Woodsman lodge member asked his friend Ed DeMoulin to make him something that would really shake up dull lodge meetings. DeMoulin owned a local factory that manufactured uniforms, flags, patches, hats, seating, upholstery, and regalia of all kinds, and he was also at heart a trickster.
Enter the DeMoulin brothers and their wonderfully strange DeMoulin Brothers catalogs, collected by New Yorker cartoonist Julia Suits in her new book, The Extraordinary Catalog of Peculiar Inventions. A treasure chest of curiosity and a history lesson in dark humor, this is equal parts bizarre and delightfully bemusing, an essential piece of pop culture’s ritualistic paradigm and a rare glimpse of twentieth-century Americana.

Oh yea, the fabulous Brain Pickings is now on Tumblr. 

bookpickings:

The Extraordinary Catalog of Peculiar Inventions: The Curious World of the Demoulin Brothers and Their Fraternal Lodge Prank Machines - from Human Centipedes and Revolving Goats to ElectricCarpets and

Julia Suits

Freemasonry was born out of medieval craft guilds — working men distinguished by their freedom, not bonded into serfdom, indenture, or slavery. Masons were primarily aristocratic, and if not wealthy, then at least refined. The fraternal lodges of the Elks, the Shriners, the Woodsmen, and the Moose, to name a few, offered a more casual form of brotherhood. Developed with masonic screeds in mind, they populated small towns and suburbs and its provided its members with a reason to get together once or twice a week. 

 In 1892, a Woodsman lodge member asked his friend Ed DeMoulin to make him something that would really shake up dull lodge meetings. DeMoulin owned a local factory that manufactured uniforms, flags, patches, hats, seating, upholstery, and regalia of all kinds, and he was also at heart a trickster.

Enter the DeMoulin brothers and their wonderfully strange DeMoulin Brothers catalogs, collected by New Yorker cartoonist Julia Suits in her new book, The Extraordinary Catalog of Peculiar Inventions. A treasure chest of curiosity and a history lesson in dark humor, this is equal parts bizarre and delightfully bemusing, an essential piece of pop culture’s ritualistic paradigm and a rare glimpse of twentieth-century Americana.