Wednesday, September 4, 2013
citysleep:

turnabout:

davenport-6:


Imagine a Brooklyn magazine that wrote about things like the drinking problems of Brooklyn writers, the difficulty in finding the perfect Brooklyn apartment, the proper subway etiquette, the best Brooklyn neighborhood to indulge in a little heavy petting, the cutest dogs in the borough, and the boom in baby strollers on the sidewalks. Impossible, right? That is basically impossible for you to imagine, because you don’t have to imagine it. It is all too real. But now—and here’s where your mind gets blown wide open, wide like the swinging limbs of a flapper dancing the Charleston—imagine that all these things weren’t being written about today, but were instead being written about over 80 years ago, in an Art Deco-era magazine called The Brooklynite.

(via The Brooklynite: Flappers Were the Original Hipsters | Brooklyn Abridged)
You really should check out this story about a long-forgotten Brooklyn-based magazine, which, along with The Chicagoan, was sort of an also-ran cousin to the New Yorker. During its brief run from approximately 1926 to 1930, The Brooklynite took on the most topical issues of the day:
On Manhattan: "Necessity the other day drove us into the confines of Lower Manhattan. The place invariably makes us blue so lacking is it in the healthy life and bustle of our own teeming thoroughfares. We dropped in at Trinity Church cemetery to get cheered up if possible and sat down on a tombstone."
Listicles — yes, listicles — enumerating what the editorial staff both hated and loved about Brooklyn. (Hates: “the L train”; Loves: “the Vale of Cashmere at dawn.”)
On Ernest Hemingway: “When you’ve read one book by him, you’ve read them all.”
On child rearing: Enumerating any number of national or local troubles, the magazine concludes that you can “take any one of these problems, national or local, and it pales into oblivion behind the problem of child-rearing.”
Beer.  Mustn’t forget the beer.
On The Brooklynite's mission: It “will never seek to edify.  If it accomplishes that sometimes, well — who cares.”
The Brooklynite appears to have ended its run in 1930 — probably a victim of a publishing industry in distress in the early years of the Great Depression.
Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

Amazing.

!!!!!

citysleep:

turnabout:

davenport-6:

Imagine a Brooklyn magazine that wrote about things like the drinking problems of Brooklyn writers, the difficulty in finding the perfect Brooklyn apartment, the proper subway etiquette, the best Brooklyn neighborhood to indulge in a little heavy petting, the cutest dogs in the borough, and the boom in baby strollers on the sidewalks. Impossible, right? That is basically impossible for you to imagine, because you don’t have to imagine it. It is all too real. But now—and here’s where your mind gets blown wide open, wide like the swinging limbs of a flapper dancing the Charleston—imagine that all these things weren’t being written about today, but were instead being written about over 80 years ago, in an Art Deco-era magazine called The Brooklynite.

(via The Brooklynite: Flappers Were the Original Hipsters | Brooklyn Abridged)

You really should check out this story about a long-forgotten Brooklyn-based magazine, which, along with The Chicagoan, was sort of an also-ran cousin to the New Yorker. During its brief run from approximately 1926 to 1930, The Brooklynite took on the most topical issues of the day:

  • On Manhattan: "Necessity the other day drove us into the confines of Lower Manhattan. The place invariably makes us blue so lacking is it in the healthy life and bustle of our own teeming thoroughfares. We dropped in at Trinity Church cemetery to get cheered up if possible and sat down on a tombstone."
  • Listicles — yes, listicles — enumerating what the editorial staff both hated and loved about Brooklyn. (Hates: “the L train”; Loves: “the Vale of Cashmere at dawn.”)
  • On Ernest Hemingway: “When you’ve read one book by him, you’ve read them all.”
  • On child rearing: Enumerating any number of national or local troubles, the magazine concludes that you can “take any one of these problems, national or local, and it pales into oblivion behind the problem of child-rearing.”
  • Beer.  Mustn’t forget the beer.
  • On The Brooklynite's mission: It “will never seek to edify.  If it accomplishes that sometimes, well — who cares.”

The Brooklynite appears to have ended its run in 1930 — probably a victim of a publishing industry in distress in the early years of the Great Depression.

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

Amazing.

!!!!!

Wednesday, May 23, 2012
From Flavorwire:

Jason K, of 84/5 Studio, has created a series of beautifully executed 8.5” x 11” mini-posters for Miyazaki classics, from Castle in the Sky to Ponyo, in the style of well-loved and gently worn vintage Penguin book covers. See the series, which we spotted via Boing Boing, after the jump, and buy the posters — or a set of nine postcards to send to all your Studio Ghibli fan friends — at 84/5 Studio’s Etsy store.

This is a reminder that we still need to see The Secret World of Arrietty. 

From Flavorwire:

Jason K, of 84/5 Studio, has created a series of beautifully executed 8.5” x 11” mini-posters for Miyazaki classics, from Castle in the Sky to Ponyo, in the style of well-loved and gently worn vintage Penguin book covers. See the series, which we spotted via Boing Boing, after the jump, and buy the posters — or a set of nine postcards to send to all your Studio Ghibli fan friends — at 84/5 Studio’s Etsy store.

This is a reminder that we still need to see The Secret World of Arrietty. 

Friday, March 16, 2012
The Learning Power Of Lego

Over 400 billion Lego blocks have been produced since it was introduced to the world, and it has become a leadingforce when it comes to teaching children logic and a bunch of other useful knowledge that we all have at some point come to use in our everyday life. Lego is no longer just a block meant for play, but also a great tool when acquiring knowledge in various areas that we previously only had a pen and paper to elaborate our ideas on. I guess some of the block’s success lies in the extreme research and development phase that initially lead up to its official release and patent in 1958. There was extensive research done in order to create the ultimate design for theproduct. There was also the challenge to find the perfect material for a long lasting toy that could be used over and over again without ending up as a broken piece of plastic. I can’t state it enough, but Lego really is the solution to everything.

Larger image at BitRebels

The Learning Power Of Lego

Over 400 billion Lego blocks have been produced since it was introduced to the world, and it has become a leadingforce when it comes to teaching children logic and a bunch of other useful knowledge that we all have at some point come to use in our everyday life. Lego is no longer just a block meant for play, but also a great tool when acquiring knowledge in various areas that we previously only had a pen and paper to elaborate our ideas on. I guess some of the block’s success lies in the extreme research and development phase that initially lead up to its official release and patent in 1958. There was extensive research done in order to create the ultimate design for theproduct. There was also the challenge to find the perfect material for a long lasting toy that could be used over and over again without ending up as a broken piece of plastic. I can’t state it enough, but Lego really is the solution to everything.

Larger image at BitRebels

Friday, November 11, 2011

What We’ve Been Reading: A Whole Lot of Nerd Going On

Langan recommends Will Ferrell on “Between Two Ferns” with Zach Galifianakis on Funny or Die. She warns it’s not suitable for work but that you should watch it at home — like she did (ed note: yea right, Langan)

Shannon decided to lighten the mood with her Veterans Day video of dogs greeting their soldier-owners as they come home from serving

Elaine liked Julie Klausner’s latest episode of her podcast, How Was Your Week. She also wants to share this super-creepy mustache Tumblr, Moustair

Rebecca would like everyone to stop the Black Friday insanity and let us enjoy our Thanksgivings in peace — and so would a few other people interviewed in that New York Times article. She also likes this roundup of geeky family photos (ed. note: because she has a geeky family)

The latest addition to our publicity team, Laura, says that if you don’t already know about the Tumblr Slaughter House 90210, you should

I, Gabrielle, am off to see the classic electronic group Plaid tonight and therefore am spreading my joy with a link to their page on the Warp Records site

Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Coworking Is Better for You Than Previously Thought
via Lifehacker

Coworking Is Better for You Than Previously Thought

via Lifehacker

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Created by Michelle Legro of Lapham’s Quarterly, Maria  Popova of Brain Pickings & Illustrator Wendy MacNaughton as part of  Longshot magazine’s Debt issue, “Circles of Influence” is a chart of  artistic, scientific, and philosophical debts through time.

Seriously considering buying one for my cube. (click through for prints!)

Created by Michelle Legro of Lapham’s Quarterly, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings & Illustrator Wendy MacNaughton as part of Longshot magazine’s Debt issue, “Circles of Influence” is a chart of artistic, scientific, and philosophical debts through time.

Seriously considering buying one for my cube. (click through for prints!)